David J. Farley of Plympton, Plymouth, United Kingdom

David J. Farley of Plympton, Plymouth, United Kingdom

Friday, July 27, 2018

Crimestoppers launches a campaign to raise awareness of 'county lines'


Crimestoppers




A national campaign aimed at raising public awareness of ‘county lines’ has been launched by Crimestoppers. Social media advertising will show the signs to spot and encourage the public to report concerns anonymously to Crimestoppers.
County lines refers to gangs and organised criminal networks which export illegal drugs into suburban, rural and coastal areas, using dedicated mobile phone lines or “deal line”. These gangs move into a rural or suburban area where they set up base, and exploit children and vulnerable adults to move drugs and money. Many of those exploited by these gangs have been forced to carry out criminal activity by threats, grooming and extortion and can be described as modern day slaves.
Increasing awareness
To help the public understand what county lines is and encourage reporting to Crimestoppers, the charity has launched a national campaign. Social media advertising will help raise awareness of the issue. During the campaign, an ad van will be present in key cities across Yorkshire and Humberside, the West Midlands, Wales, Essex, Kent, Surrey and Sussex during the campaign, to inform the public of county lines and how they can help.
Crimestoppers are working closely with the Home Office, who are running a campaign which targets staff who may encounter young people who are being exploited by county lines gangs. The Home Office campaign targets staff in the transport, private security and accommodation sector and provides them with information on how to identify if a young person may be being exploited by county lines gangs and how to safeguard that vulnerable young person. The Home Office’s campaign is just part of a wider range of work, set out in the Serious Violence Strategy (opens in a new window), to tackle county lines.
Spot the signs and report concerns
Crimestopppers’ campaign shows the signs to spot which might indicate a child or vulnerable person is being exploited by a county lines gang. The signs which you might see are:
  • A child or young person (sometimes as young as 12) in a shopping centre or high street, or on public transport during school hours or unusual hours (e.g. early in the morning, late at night.
  • A child or young person who seems unfamiliar with the local area
  • A child or young person being approached or intimidated by a controlling peer or group
  • A child or vulnerable person who is deliberately avoiding authority figures such as police officers or security guards
  • More people calling at a local address than normal, sometimes at unsociable hours
  • Suspicious vehicles or people at an address
  • A neighbour who has not been seen for a while
If you see something that doesn’t feel right, or looks suspicious, you can report your concerns anonymously to Crimestoppers. You can contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or send an untraceable online form at Crimestoppers-uk.org (opens in a new window).

Article courtesy of www.police.uk 


Friday, April 27, 2018

Prince Louis: Duke and Duchess of Cambridge reveal name of baby son



The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have named their baby son Louis Arthur Charles.
In a statement, Kensington Palace said: “The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are delighted to announce that they have named their son Louis Arthur Charles.
“The baby will be known as His Royal Highness Prince Louis of Cambridge.”
The prince is the duke and duchess’s third child, the younger brother of Prince George and Princess Charlotte, and the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh’s sixth great-grandchild.
Lord Louis Mountbatten was Prince Charles’s beloved great-uncle who was assassinated by the IRA in 1979. Prince Louis of Battenberg was the Duke of Edinburgh’s grandfather.

The three names are popular choices recycled by the royal family. Prince Charles is Charles Philip Arthur George, while Prince William is William Arthur Philip Louis. Prince George’s full name is George Alexander Louis.
Bookmakers had Arthur as the favourite for some time, then Alexander.
It has taken four days for the prince’s name to be released. He is fifth in line to the throne, and was born on Monday weighing 3.8kg (8lbs 7oz).

Both Prince George and Princess Charlotte’s names were revealed two days after their births. But Prince William’s name was not made public for seven days.
Historically, royal names are not usually announced for several days. Prince Harry was a recent exception. It was confirmed on the day he left hospital that he would be called Henry, though would be known as Harry. Prince Charles’s name was revealed one month after he was born, only being declared ahead of his christening in the Music Room at Buckingham Palace in December 1948.
The Queen is told, as a courtesy, before the name is announced.

Bookmakers celebrated the news. Alex Apati of Ladbrokes said Louis had been 10th in terms of bets placed, with odds as long as 20/1.
“Prince Louis has caught both bookies and punters by surprise. With it being one of Prince George’s middle names, fans didn’t see it as an obvious frontrunner for Kate and Wills’ second son,” he said.
The announcement is likely to prompt a revival in popularity of the name. While more common in the early 2000s, it had dropped to 71st place in the most popular name ranking in England and Wales, according to the latest Office for National Statistics figures.

Blackpool Zoo immediately announced a baby Louis of its own in celebration, bestowing the name upon a newborn double-humped Bactrian camel calf also born on Monday morning.

Article courtesy of https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/apr/27/duke-and-duchess-of-cambridge-name-their-baby-son-louis-arthur-charles

 

Monday, March 19, 2018

New Mobile Fingerprint Device lets Police identify suspects in less than a minute



A new mobile fingerprint scanning system allows police to identify a potential suspect in under a minute at the scene of an incident, according to officers testing the technology.

The system involves a small device which connects to smartphones already used by frontline officers and then uses the new Biometric Services Gateway to search records held on both police and immigration databases.

West Yorkshire Police is working with the Home Office on a trial of the system and the force is rolling out 250 of the scanners to officers in the next few weeks.

Demonstrating the device, which looks like a small mobile wifi dongle, Chief Inspector Ian Williams said: "For the first time we can now identify somebody on the street through their fingerprints, through those databases.
"We can get photographs back of the individual, we can get a full PNC (Police National Computer) record of the individual as well which gives us a really thorough identification.
"From the moment we take the fingerprint we're getting results right through to the PNC check and the photograph in less than a minute."

Mr Williams said the speed of the process meant people could sometimes be dealt with on the street without having to be taken to a police station.

An armed response unit using the device - which costs under £300 - took 10 minutes to identify a driver and issue a summons - a process which previously would have detained the team for four hours.

Mr Williams said fingerprints taken by the device will not be added to any database as it does not record and store this data.

 Article by Dave Higgens. Courtesy of www.independent.co.uk