David J. Farley of Plympton, Plymouth, United Kingdom

David J. Farley of Plympton, Plymouth, United Kingdom

Monday, April 24, 2017

Drones flying into prisons to be examined by new Police team




The Prison Service and police are to pool intelligence to stop drones flying drugs and mobile phones to prison inmates in England and Wales.
They will forensically examine captured drones to try to find out who was flying them.
The invention of easy-to-fly, remote-controlled aircraft has caused a huge security headache for prisons.
But critics have called the plan a "red herring" to distract people from "chaos and crisis" in prisons.
The national initiative will see police and prison officers share information about the quadcopters and methods used.
Prisons Minister Sam Gyimah said: "We are absolutely determined to tackle the illegal flow of drugs and mobile phones into our prisons and turn them into places of safety and reform.
"The threat posed by drones is clear but our dedicated staff are committed to winning the fight against those who are attempting to thwart progress by wreaking havoc in establishments all over the country.
"My message to those who involve themselves in this type of criminal activity is clear: we will find you and put you behind bars."

Staff corruption

The Prison Service could not give details about how many officers would be involved, but reports suggested £3m would be spent on the new task force.
John Podmore, former head of the service's anti-corruption unit, said whilst there was an issue with contraband in prisons, targeting this money at drones was a "PR stunt".
"I have seen no evidence that there is a real problem with drones," he told BBC Radio 4's Today programme. "I think the number of incidents last year was 33.
"There are some 10,000 mobile phones found every year in prisons. My question to the Prison Service would be, how many of those were found hanging from drones?"
Instead, Mr Podmore thought the service should be looking the wider issue of contraband smuggling, including the "main route [of] staff corruption".
Mike Rolfe, national chair of the Prison Officers Association, said prisoners had told him that they had seen two or three drones a night delivering packages over the walls.
However, he said he agreed with Mr Podmore that the initiative was an attempt to distract people from "the real issue [of] jails in complete chaos, in a crisis and flooded with drugs, mobile phones and weapons".

Recent successes

BBC home affairs correspondent Daniel Sandford says prison walls are now not much of a barrier for those wanting to smuggle contraband into jails.
There have been some recent successes in finding and punishing those who are behind the drone flights, says the Ministry of Justice.
In December, Dean Rawley-Bell, 21, was jailed for four years and eight months after he used a drone in attempts to smuggle drugs and mobile phones into Manchester Prison.
Renelle Carlisle, 23, was sentenced to three years and four months in October after he was caught outside Risley Prison in Warrington with a drone in his bag, trying to smuggle drugs inside.
In July, 37-year-old Daniel Kelly was jailed for 14 months for trying to supply contraband to offenders in Elmley and Swaleside Prison in Sheppey, Wandsworth Prison in London and the Mount Prison in Hemel Hempstead.


Article courtesy of BBC News


Friday, February 17, 2017

Queen's Police Medal Awards


Over half of the Queen’s Police Medals
have been awarded to officers below the rank of superintendent.
Nine rank and file police officers have been 
awarded the prestigious Queen’s Police Medal
by Her Majesty The Queen as part of her 
New Year’s Honours – 3 times the number 
honoured in the 2016 Birthday Honours.
In one of her final actions as Home Secretary,
Prime MinisterTheresa May recommended 
that more officers below senior 
ranks should receive the Queen’s Police Medal, 
to recognise the vital role they play in protecting 
the public and address an imbalance over to 
whom the medal is awarded.
Police leaders responded by putting forward 
a number officers from junior ranks from 
across England and Wales who have shown 
outstanding courage and distinguished 
service in the line of duty. More than half 
of the 17 Queen’s Police Medals announced 
today have been awarded to officers below 
the rank of superintendent.
Home Secretary Amber Rudd said:
These deserving recipients of Queen’s Police
Medals have gone above and beyond 
the call of their duties and it is absolutely 
right that we recognise all of those who serve 
our communities and keep us safe.

I am especially pleased by the response 
from policing leaders, who have made sure 
that a shift in nominations has led to a much 
more representative group of officers
receiving the medal. I look forward to seeing 
many more brave and talented individuals 
at every rank of our police forces being 
honoured in this way in the future.
The Queen’s Police Medal was instituted 
by its royal warrant in 1954 and is awarded 
to officers of any rank for acts of courage 
and/or conspicuous devotion to duty. 
It superseded the King’s Police Medal, 
which was originally created in 1909.
Minister for Policing and the Fire Service 
Brandon Lewis said: There are exceptionally 
skilled, dedicated and professional 
officers in all areas of our police forces, 
from frontline constables to senior leaders. 
Honours such as the Queen’s Police Medal 
have been awarded for over 100 years to 
recognise some of their exceptional individual 
contributions.
I am delighted that more rank and file 
officers have been awarded the medal 
this year, for dedication to their duties and 
acts of exceptional courage. I hope
the example they have set continues to 
inspire the very best from officers and 
police staff in 2017.
The recipients of the Queen’s Police Medal 
are:
  • PC Ifor Williams 
  • (Avon and Somerset Police)
  • Sergeant Timothy Slade 
  • (City of London Police)
  • PC Jacqueline Oliver
  • (Metropolitan Police Service)
  • Chief Superintendent Martin Lloyd Fry
  • (British Transport Police)
  • PC Leslie Roger Eke 
  • (Thames Valley Police)
  • PC Christopher Smith 
  • (Dorset Police)
  • PC Louise Pye 
  • (Sussex Police)
  • PC Shirley Vivienne Lindsay 
  • (Avon and Somerset Police)
  • Inspector Ian David Hanson 
  • (Greater Manchester Police)
  • Detective Inspector Carol Ellwood 
  • (Humberside Police)
  • Chief Superintendent Gordon Briggs
  •  (Metropolitan Police Service)
  • Chief Superintendent Victor Olisa 
  • (Metropolitan Police Service)
  • Chief Superintendent Jagdev Singh Atwal 
  • (Derbyshire Constabulary)
  • Assistant Chief Constable David John Allard 
  • (Ministry of Defence Police)
  • Temporary Assistant Chief Constable
  •  Angela Williams (West Yorkshire Police)
  • Commander Simon Martin Letchford 
  • (Metropolitan Police Service)
  • Chief Constable David Graham Jones 
  • (North Yorkshire Police)

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

May the spirit of this Holy season remain with you always. Wishing for peace in this troubled world.



Thursday, December 01, 2016

The Nightmare of Ageing !




HAVE YOU EVER BEEN GUILTY OF LOOKING AT OTHERS YOUR OWN AGE AND THINKING, SURELY I CAN'T LOOK THAT OLD? WELL... YOU'LL LOVE THIS ONE!


MY NAME IS ALICE SMITH AND I WAS SITTING IN THE WAITING ROOM FOR MY FIRST APPOINTMENT WITH A NEW DENTIST. I NOTICED HIS DENTAL DIPLOMA, WHICH BORE HIS FULL NAME


SUDDENLY, I REMEMBERED A TALL, HANDSOME, DARK HAIRED BOY WITH THE SAME NAME HAD BEEN IN MY SECONDARY SCHOOL CLASS SOME 40-ODD YEARS AGO. COULD HE BE THE SAME GUY THAT I HAD A SECRET CRUSH ON, WAY BACK THEN?


UPON SEEING HIM, HOWEVER,  I QUICKLY DISCARDED ANY SUCH THOUGHT. THIS BALDING, GREY HAIRED MAN WITH THE DEEPLY LINED FACE WAS FAR TOO OLD TO HAVE BEEN MY CLASSMATE. AFTER HE EXAMINED MY TEETH, I ASKED HIM IF HE HAD ATTENDED MORGAN PARK SECONDARY SCHOOL.


'YES, YES I DID. I'M A MORGANNER!’ HE BEAMED WITH PRIDE. 'WHEN DID YOU LEAVE TO GO TO COLLEGE?' I ASKED, HE ANSWERED, IN 1965. WHY DO YOU ASK?


 'YOU WERE IN MY CLASS!'  I EXCLAIMED. HE LOOKED AT ME CLOSELY.
THEN THE UGLY, OLD, BALD, WRINKLED, FAT ARSED, GREY HAIRED, DECREPIT, ASKED


                                     " WHAT SUBJECT DID YOU TEACH?’




Monday, October 17, 2016

Parish Safety Volunteers

Multi-agency in Essex to help vulnerable people

A new scheme will see Essex County Fire and Rescue Service and Essex Police working together to help make people safer in their homes.

The Parish Safety Volunteer scheme sees volunteers delivering fire safety, crime prevention and signposting people to well-being advice and help to people living in the same Parish as them. Created using funding from Essex County Council's Strengthening Communities Board, the scheme is an example of the excellent collaborative work taking place between Essex police and fire services.

Each visit will last around an hour and will include crime prevention advice, fire safety advice, fitting of free smoke alarms, and letting people know where to get the best health and wellbeing guidance.

All of the volunteers undergo training by both police and fire service officers so they have the knowledge they need to deliver messages on behalf of both organisations. Two volunteers are already working in Wivenhoe and another 10 are nearing the end of their training and will soon be helping people in villages across the county. Acting Chief Fire Officer Adam Eckley said: “The Parish Safety Volunteer scheme is a fantastic example of the collaborative work taking place between us and Essex Police as we work together to make Essex safer.

“This is a community-based scheme and by using volunteers we are able to forge vital links in these communities which will live on long after the safety visit has taken place. “The volunteers all live in the same parish where they are carrying out the visits, they will be familiar faces to people in that community and that means that us and the police will have links to those people and their communities after the visits are over.

“This scheme shows the direction both organisations are heading in as we work more closely together to deliver protection and prevention advice to communities across Essex.”

Stephen Kavanagh, Chief Constable of Essex Police, said: “The enthusiasm and community spirit of Parish Safety Volunteers will be put to best use – making our communities safer.

“For both the police and the fire service it’s really important that we provide the right training so volunteers can give out vital guidance to residents on fire safety and how to make their homes more secure. Every smoke alarm fitted and every lock securing a shed or security light putting off a would-be burglar adds value to the work Parish Safety Volunteers are doing.”

Learn more about how our emergency services are developing new service delivery models by attending the Congress on Reimagining the Emergency Services on November 16, at West Midlands Fire Service HQ, Birmingham. This brings together the fire and rescue service, the police and ambulance service to discuss and develop a new blueprint for an integrated service delivery model for the emergency services.

Article courtesy of www.fire-magazine.com

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Gorilla drags boy along Cincinatti Zoo moat

Zoo shoots gorilla dead to protect boy who was pulled into enclosure.

A special zoo response team shot and killed a gorilla on Saturday that grabbed and dragged a four-year-old boy who fell into the gorilla exhibit moat, the Cincinnati Zoo's director said.

Authorities said the boy, who fell 10 to 12 feet, is expected to recover after being picked up out of the moat and dragged by the 17-year-old gorilla for about 10 minutes. He was taken to Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center.

The three-year-old boy was deemed to be in a life-threatening situation when he fell into the gorilla exhibit moat. Director Thane Maynard said the zoo's dangerous animal response team that practices for such incidents decided the boy was in "a life-threatening situation" and that they needed to put down the 400-pound-plus male gorilla named Harambe.

"They made a tough choice and they made the right choice because they saved that little boy's life," Maynard said. "It could have been very bad."

Maynard said he had not yet talked to the boy's parents.

He said the gorilla didn't appear to be attacking the child, but he said it was "an extremely strong" animal in an agitated situation. He said tranquilising the gorilla wouldn't have knocked it out immediately, leaving the boy in danger.

Maynard said it was the first time that the team had killed a zoo animal in such an emergency situation, and he called it "a very sad day" at the zoo. The lowland gorilla is an endangered species.

The incident was reported at around 4pm. The area around the gorilla exhibit was closed off Saturday afternoon as zoo visitors reported hearing screaming.

Harambe came to Cincinnati in 2015 from the Gladys Porter Zoo in Brownsville, Texas.

Hospital officials said they couldn't release any information on the child. Authorities hadn't released the child's name.

Maynard said the zoo's Gorilla World area would be open as usual on Sunday. He said the zoo believed the exhibit remains safe. They are still investigating, but zoo officials believe the boy crawled through a railing barrier, then fell into the moat.

The zoo prides itself for its work in protecting endangered species, and has been part of successful captive breeding efforts in recent years in the effort to save the endangered Sumatran rhino.

Article courtesy of the Press Association.

Friday, April 15, 2016

Food Bank use at record levels, says Trussell Trust charity

Food bank use remains at record levels, with more than 1.1 million units of emergency supplies given out by a leading charity in the last year, figures have revealed. The Trussell Trust said there was a 2% increase in three-day supplies provided to people from its network of 424 food banks in the 2015/16 financial year. More than 415,000 went to children, while on average people were referred to food banks twice in the past year.

Almost half of food banks said there had been an increase in the number of people needing emergency supplies because of benefit sanctions, while other problems included low wages, high living costs or insecure work contracts.

The trust said a million emergency food supplies a year must not become the "new normal". Trust chief executive David McAuley said: "Today's figures on national food bank use prove that the numbers of people hitting a crisis where they cannot afford to buy food are still far too high. "One million three-day food supplies given out by our food banks every year is one million too many. "Reducing UK hunger will require a collective effort from the voluntary sector, Government, businesses and the public, and the Trussell Trust is keen to work with all these groups to find solutions that stop so many people needing food banks in future."

The report said there was a clear link between food bank use and areas of high deprivation. More than 40,000 volunteers helped at food banks in the past year and the public donated over 10,500 tonnes of food. Most of the trust's food banks also offer legal and welfare advice, housing support and clothes. The trust said its figures do not reveal the full scale of food poverty in the UK because other groups also offer food aid.

A Government spokesman said: "Reasons for foodbank use are complex so it is misleading to link them to any one thing. "This Government is determined to move to a higher-wage society, introducing the new National Living Wage that will benefit over one million workers directly this year, and we're also spending £80 billion on working-age benefits to ensure a strong safety net for those who need it most. "The vast majority of benefits are processed on time and the number of sanctions have actually gone down."

Shadow environment, food and rural affairs secretary Kerry McCarthy said: "It is a national scandal that food bank usage is continuing to rise. "Food banks have become a truly shameful symbol of a Tory Government that is failing to stand up for ordinary people. While those at the top are given tax breaks, others are struggling to get by. "Emergency food aid should remain just that - food banks can never be allowed to become a permanent feature of British society."

Unite general secretary Len McCluskey said: "Following hard on the heels of the billions stashed abroad by the rich and powerful we have today's heart-rending report from the Trussell Trust that hundreds of thousands of our fellow-citizens, including children, are struggling, one step away from starvation, in the fifth richest economy in the world. "If anything demonstrated the fierce and burning inequality engulfing our country, it is the repugnant contrast between a rich elite who can enjoy tax-light arrangements for the cash they have squirrelled away in the British Virgin Islands with the tales of daily despair emanating from the trust's 424 foodbanks."

Dr Eilidh Whiteford, the SNP's spokeswoman for Social Justice and Welfare, said: "That there is already an existing and desperate need for foodbanks in Scotland and across the UK is a complete disgrace but these figures show that foodbank use is actually increasing which shows just how badly the Tories have got it wrong."

Rachael Orr, Oxfam's head of UK programme said: "It's worrying that the number of food parcels given out by the Trussell Trust has risen yet again, topping a million for the second year in a row."

Article courtesy of the Press Association.